Psy Says He's Satisfied With The Success Of 'Gentleman' Because 'It Proved I Wasn't A One-Hit Wonder' [VIDEO]

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<div>Psy Says He's Satisfied With The Success Of 'Gentleman' Because 'It Proved I Wasn't A One-Hit Wonder' [VIDEO]</div>

"Gangnam Style" may have been the song that made Psy an international celebrity, but it was "Gentleman" that allowed him to get on with his life.
"Gangnam Style" may have been the song that made Psy an international celebrity, but according to the South Korean rapper, it was "Gentleman" that allowed him to get on with his life.
In this month's issue of L'Uomo Vogue, the Italian version of the popular magazine, Psy, who is the first Korean artist to grace the publication's cover, explained why "Gentleman" allowed him to breathe a sigh of relief.
"After Gentleman was out, I was really satisfied with what it had done, because it proved that I was not a one hit wonder, a lucky shot," Psy said.Like Us on Facebook :

"Nobody can ever label me that now. 'Gentleman' has 500 billion views right now, the song also hit number one in 81 countries, and I am really relieved by that. Now I can really do what I have to do, comfortably. I don't have to make another dancing phenomenon, I am just going back to where I came from and it's really comfortable right now."
"Gentleman" has reportedly broken YouTube records in five categories, including most views in a video clip's first 24 hours, the most views in any 24 hours and the video to reach 200 million, 300 million and 400 million views the fastest.
"Gangnam Style" remains the most watched video clip in Internet history, with over 1.8 billion views.
Psy compared "Gentleman" to a bunt coming off of the bat of Major League Baseball player Hyun-jin Ryu.
"I feel like Hyun-jin Ryu a baseball player from South Korea who plays for the Los Angeles Dodgers," Psy explained.
"One time he was just trying to swing it while he was closing his eyes, and he accidentally hit a home run, and the next time he was up, the crowd was calling for another home run, but honestly, he went for a bunt instead, so runners could advance to second base. So for me, 'Gentleman' was that bunt, so now runners are on second base, and now it's my time and I don't have to hit another home run, and if I just hit one single and you can score because I made a bunt that's even better."
The King of YouTube, whose real name is Park Jae-sang, also revealed how the food tent scene in the "Gentleman" video was inspired by his own love of local cuisine.
"We are eating in a tent, it's a pojangmacha, and the late-night streets of Seoul are packed with them," he said.
"The name literally means 'tented wagon', and they're something like a dive bar combined with a street food stall, serving up hearty, spicy, salty food to go with bottles of soju [Japanese distilled liquor] and beer."
Click here to read the full Psy interview in this month's L'Uomo Vogue
Check out Psy's record-breaking "Gentleman" video RIGHT HERE